Community Support & Recovery Plan

Supporting our Business Community

On May 5, City Council approved a Community Support and Recovery Plan (CSRP), that includes immediate relief for taxpayers and a recovery fund to address the pandemic’s short- and long-term financial impact on all sectors of the community. It includes:

• Deferring 2020 utility and property tax deadlines for all property types to Sept. 30;

• Designating $5-million to implement a response plan with both short- and long-term support for businesses, residents and non-profits;

• Seeking federal and provincial stimulus funding for City capital projects to promote economic recovery; and

• Additional measures to be included

Supporting our Business Community

On May 5, City Council approved a Community Support and Recovery Plan (CSRP), that includes immediate relief for taxpayers and a recovery fund to address the pandemic’s short- and long-term financial impact on all sectors of the community. It includes:

• Deferring 2020 utility and property tax deadlines for all property types to Sept. 30;

• Designating $5-million to implement a response plan with both short- and long-term support for businesses, residents and non-profits;

• Seeking federal and provincial stimulus funding for City capital projects to promote economic recovery; and

• Additional measures to be included in the 2021 budget.

City staff are now moving forward with refining the CSRP and a host of ideas are being considered, including targeted grants, reduced or waived City fees, technology investments and marketing to support local businesses. Staff plan to present specific CSRP recommendations to Council in late May.

Business Supports

We have more than 7,000 businesses in Coquitlam, ranging from home-based operations to large enterprises with hundreds of employees. The City recognizes that this is a very challenging time for many of our local businesses as they face the impacts and the uncertainty of the current public health crisis.

From the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Coquitlam’s Economic Development team has been reaching out to local business stakeholders and researching how best to support our community’s business sector. Over the coming weeks and months, City staff will continue to work with other levels of government, as well as business support organizations and other industry stakeholders, to help identify and inform our next steps.

This page has been developed to provide ongoing updates and information resources to Coquitlam’s business community. This will include opportunities for input, links to government and industry assistance programs, and a Q&A forum to get answers to your questions.

Stay Up-to-Date

Register here to receive emails on new programs and supports offered to Coquitlam businesses.

You can also sign up to be notified when there are updates to this project page. Click on the Subscribe button above.


Category Province of BC News   Show all

  • B.C.’s strong fiscal response, economic foundation support people - Government of B.C.

    14 Jul 2020

    July 14, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic will mark British Columbians' lifetimes in ways never thought possible, and the Province is investing in people, businesses and communities to see them through the pandemic and build back better.

    “B.C. has made extraordinary investments in people and businesses through B.C.’s COVID-19 Action Plan and we will continue to provide the supports people need as the pandemic and the economic impacts evolve,” said Carole James, Minister of Finance.

    The B.C. government has released an economic and fiscal update for 2020-21 to provide a summary of COVID-19 investments to date, as well as a scenario of revenue and deficit projections.

    Government has supported people and businesses with $6.26 billion in COVID-19 supports to date. That includes the $5 billion in supplementary spending for B.C.’s COVID-19 Action Plan supports, such as workers benefits, rent supplements, income and disability assistance supports and economic recovery funding. These are in addition to $1.26 billion in other tax and relief measures for people and businesses, including the one-time increase to the climate action tax credit and property tax reductions for businesses.

    With the pandemic response for British Columbians, and a significant revenue decline due to the pandemic, the Province’s total operating deficit for 2020-21 could be $12.5 billion, based on projections developed by the Ministry of Finance.

    “B.C.’s safe restart plan is creating signs of hope for our economy as consumer confidence increases. These results have only been possible because of our strong public health measures,” James said. “As we continue our work to create a strong recovery, we also have an opportunity to build a stronger B.C. that works for everyone in our province.”

    British Columbia has made progress flattening the curve because of its strong health policy and a commitment to help keep each other safe. The Province is building an economic recovery plan that puts people first, with input from British Columbians, businesses and community organizations – so everyone has a good job and a secure future.

    “The pandemic has exposed underlying gaps in our economy and society,” James said. “We have been reminded of the need for strong public services and supports, workplace safety and our collective responsibility to take care of each other, and I’m looking forward to putting people’s input into action as we move forward with the economic recovery of our province.”

    As part of the COVID-19 Action Plan, $1.5 billion has been earmarked for economic recovery measures to be announced in September.

  • Support service helps over 4,200 businesses during pandemic - Government of B.C.

    09 Jul 2020

    The B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service has served more than 4,200 businesses through phone, chat and email since its launch in April 2020, and has had more than 200,000 visits to its COVID-19 web page.

    The support service is a crucial link that helps businesses navigate the supports and services offered by the provincial and federal governments, and industry and community partners, during the pandemic. It is operated by Small Business BC (SBBC), a not-for-profit organization that delivers a variety of services to B.C. businesses through financial support from the provincial and federal governments.

    “Businesses need the support service to help navigate the rapid pace of change during this pandemic,” said Michelle Mungall, Minister of Jobs, Economic Development and Competitiveness. “We greatly appreciate our partnership with SBBC and the work it does for the business community. The support service is invaluable, and it will continue to be in place during the economic restart so that businesses can get the support they need to re-open, provide jobs and contribute to our communities.”

    Numerous supports have been announced by the provincial and federal governments to support businesses that have been impacted by the pandemic. The B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service brings all the information together in one place, making it easy for businesses to access the resources they need.

    “This is a difficult time for businesses, but there’s help at hand,” said Tom Conway, CEO, Small Business BC. “We’ve established the support service to ensure that businesses are able to access and leverage all the supports they are eligible for, so that they can emerge successfully from the impacts of this pandemic.”

    In addition to the support service, SBBC continues to offer numerous other free and low-cost resources to help businesses succeed, including webinars and customized business advice, and the recently launched online non-medical Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Marketplace.

    The new online PPE directory has been put in place to help businesses find vendors who supply non-medical products, like hand sanitizer, masks and face shields. This further supports B.C.’s restart plan by creating safe workspaces for employees and helping customers return with confidence, knowing that the businesses they are visiting are taking the required precautions.

    "As a startup impacted by the aftermath of COVID-19, we were struggling to find government support programs that we qualified for until we got in touch with the B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service,” said Jonathan Kim, CEO of The Home Key, a professional workspace for the e-sports and gaming community in downtown Vancouver. "The staff were incredibly helpful and took the time to reconnect with our company as new support measures were deployed. With their insight, we managed to stay one step ahead on applications and are optimistic about the programs we applied for."

    Government remains committed to supporting B.C. businesses as they recover from the impacts of the pandemic.

    Quick Facts:

    • The B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service is supported by the B.C. government and the Government of Canada through Western Economic Diversification Canada.
    • Advisors are available Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Pacific time) at 1 833 254-4357.
    • Inquiries can also be emailed to covid@smallbusinessbc.ca, or raised on the live-chat feature available on SBBC’s dedicated website: https://covid.smallbusinessbc.ca
    • Support is available in multiple languages and a call-back feature is in place to help manage high call volumes.
    • Suppliers interested in being listed as a vendor in the non-medical PPE Marketplace can submit a request through SBBC to be part of the marketplace.

    Learn More:

    For more information on the B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service, visit: https://covid.smallbusinessbc.ca

    For more information on the PPE Marketplace, visit: marketplace.smallbusinessbc.ca/ppe

    For more information on Small Business BC’s regular services, such as educational webinars, access to expert business advisors, and more small business resources, visit: https://smallbusinessbc.ca/

    For more information about BC’s Restart Plan, visit: www.gov.bc.ca/restartbc

  • B.C. government seeks input on how to spend $1.5 billion for 'stimulus and recovery' - Tri-City News

    18 Jun 2020

    The B.C. government plans to spend an additional six weeks consulting the public on how to spend $1.5 billion that it has set aside to help with "stimulus and recovery" from the COVID-19 pandemic, Premier John Horgan announced June 17.

    His government in March announced a $5 billion commitment to meet needs arising from the pandemic, including $3.5 billion that is already being provided to B.C. residents, and businesses.

    It has not determined how it will spend the remaining $1.5 billion despite what Horgan said has been more than 1,500 "outreach sessions," with business executives, labour leaders, community organizers and others. In total, government representatives have spoken with more than 20,000 people, he said.

    B.C. has about 314,000 people who are out of work, and many businesses are struggling to survive – something that demonstrates clear financial need. With about 90% of job losses in the service sector, which disproportionately employs women and youth, Horgan said those demographics have been hardest hit.

    Still, he defended not spending all of the money his government has set aside for stimulus and recovery, and instead getting more feedback, because "stimulus in a time when you're asking people to stay home is poorly spent resources," he said.

    Horgan hinted that much of the $1.5 billion in future spending could be spent to encourage tourism.

    "Destination British Columbia's plan for tourism, domestic tourism this summer, is not well spent if we have not yet come to a place where we can lift travel restrictions," he said.

    Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry had said that she did not want British Columbians to be travelling around the province at least until there have been at least two full incubation periods for the COVID-19 virus, or 28 days, after the May 19 Phase 2 reopening of sectors of the economy, such as hair salons and nail bars.

    The province has now gone beyond that time period, but Henry said on June 15 that lifting restrictions may not begin this week. Then again, "maybe" they will. The determining factor will be data.

    The three main ways that the B.C. government plans to interact with residents to get ideas and set priorities are:

    • online surveys;
    • responses to a report named Building B.C.'s Recovery, Together: Have Your Say; and
    • virtual town halls.

    "This is not about waiting another six weeks," Horgan said. "This is about six more weeks of discussions with British Columbians. We have been investing in every aspect of the economy, including tourism. We have a Destination BC advertising plan ready to kick off. We've been engaging with tourist operators, whether they be eco-tourist operators on the Central Coast, whether it be the Butchart Gardens here in Victoria. We've been talking to people about how can we maximize the benefits in this extraordinary time."

    While Horgan said that his government is having regular conversations with the federal government to "mesh" benefits, he would not commit to extending the temporary rental supplement past the end of June. That program provides $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents, and $500 per month for eligible households with dependents.

    Horgan similarly declined to clarify whether there will be any extension of the one-time $1,000 B.C. Emergency Response Benefit for workers that is accessible for those who are also on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). The CERB had been planned to end in early July but yesterday was extended by eight weeks.


    Still, he defended not spending all of the money his government has set aside for stimulus and recovery, and instead getting more feedback, because "stimulus in a time when you're asking people to stay home is poorly spent resources," he said.

    Horgan hinted that much of the $1.5 billion in future spending could be spent to encourage tourism.

    "Destination British Columbia's plan for tourism, domestic tourism this summer, is not well spent if we have not yet come to a place where we can lift travel restrictions," he said.

    Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry had said that she did not want British Columbians to be travelling around the province at least until there have been at least two full incubation periods for the COVID-19 virus, or 28 days, after the May 19 Phase 2 reopening of sectors of the economy, such as hair salons and nail bars.

    The province has now gone beyond that time period, but Henry said on June 15 that lifting restrictions may not begin this week. Then again, "maybe" they will. The determining factor will be data.

    The three main ways that the B.C. government plans to interact with residents to get ideas and set priorities are:
    •online surveys;
    •responses to a report named Building B.C.'s Recovery, Together: Have Your Say; and
    •virtual town halls.

    "This is not about waiting another six weeks," Horgan said. "This is about six more weeks of discussions with British Columbians. We have been investing in every aspect of the economy, including tourism. We have a Destination BC advertising plan ready to kick off. We've been engaging with tourist operators, whether they be eco-tourist operators on the Central Coast, whether it be the Butchart Gardens here in Victoria. We've been talking to people about how can we maximize the benefits in this extraordinary time."

    While Horgan said that his government is having regular conversations with the federal government to "mesh" benefits, he would not commit to extending the temporary rental supplement past the end of June. That program provides $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents, and $500 per month for eligible households with dependents.

    Horgan similarly declined to clarify whether there will be any extension of the one-time $1,000 B.C. Emergency Response Benefit for workers that is accessible for those who are also on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). The CERB had been planned to end in early July but yesterday was extended by eight weeks.


    B.C. has about 314,000 people who are out of work, and many businesses are struggling to survive – something that demonstrates clear financial need. With about 90% of job losses in the service sector, which disproportionately employs women and youth, Horgan said those demographics have been hardest hit.

    Still, he defended not spending all of the money his government has set aside for stimulus and recovery, and instead getting more feedback, because "stimulus in a time when you're asking people to stay home is poorly spent resources," he said.

    Horgan hinted that much of the $1.5 billion in future spending could be spent to encourage tourism.

    "Destination British Columbia's plan for tourism, domestic tourism this summer, is not well spent if we have not yet come to a place where we can lift travel restrictions," he said.

    Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry had said that she did not want British Columbians to be travelling around the province at least until there have been at least two full incubation periods for the COVID-19 virus, or 28 days, after the May 19 Phase 2 reopening of sectors of the economy, such as hair salons and nail bars.

    The province has now gone beyond that time period, but Henry said on June 15 that lifting restrictions may not begin this week. Then again, "maybe" they will. The determining factor will be data.

    The three main ways that the B.C. government plans to interact with residents to get ideas and set priorities are:
    •online surveys;
    •responses to a report named Building B.C.'s Recovery, Together: Have Your Say; and
    •virtual town halls.

    "This is not about waiting another six weeks," Horgan said. "This is about six more weeks of discussions with British Columbians. We have been investing in every aspect of the economy, including tourism. We have a Destination BC advertising plan ready to kick off. We've been engaging with tourist operators, whether they be eco-tourist operators on the Central Coast, whether it be the Butchart Gardens here in Victoria. We've been talking to people about how can we maximize the benefits in this extraordinary time."

    While Horgan said that his government is having regular conversations with the federal government to "mesh" benefits, he would not commit to extending the temporary rental supplement past the end of June. That program provides $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents, and $500 per month for eligible households with dependents.

    Horgan similarly declined to clarify whether there will be any extension of the one-time $1,000 B.C. Emergency Response Benefit for workers that is accessible for those who are also on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). The CERB had been planned to end in early July but yesterday was extended by eight weeks.


    His government in March announced a $5 billion commitment to meet needs arising from the pandemic, including $3.5 billion that is already being provided to B.C. residents, and businesses.

  • Closed hospitality businesses permitted to sell liquor stock during pandemic

    10 Jun 2020

    The Province is providing temporary relief to hospitality licensees who have had to suspend their operations as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    These licensees will be allowed to sell their existing liquor stock to other licensees who are still operating and/or to private liquor stores.

    These changes will provide immediate financial relief for licensees unable to meet the guidelines and mandates established by the provincial health officer by allowing them to liquidate some inventory.

    The temporary authorization from the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) was requested by the Business and Technical Advisory Panel, a group of liquor industry leaders, as a way of supporting the industry during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    This authorization is set to expire on July 15, 2020. However, as the pandemic is an evolving situation, LDB will review this and other temporary authorizations as necessary.

    Government has introduced other temporary actions in support of the hospitality industry, including authorizing all food-primary and most liquor-primary establishments to sell and deliver sealed, packaged liquor products for off-site consumption alongside the purchase of a meal, and allowing the expansion of service areas and patios so businesses can continue observing the provincial health officer's mandates as they begin to recover from the impact of COVID-19.

    Learn More:

    Read LDB’s policy directive here: https://wholesale.bcldb.com/sites/default/files/files/2020-06/Private%20Sale%20of%20Liquor%20During%20COVID19%20Pandemic%20Policy.pdf

    For the latest medical updates, including case counts, prevention, risks and testing, visit: http://www.bccdc.ca/
    Or follow @CDCofBC on Twitter.

    For provincial health officer's orders, notices and guidance, visit: www.gov.bc.ca/phoguidance

    For non-health related information, including financial, child care and education supports, travel, transportation and essential service information, visit: www.gov.bc.ca/Covid-19
    Or call 1 888 COVID19 (1 888 268-4319) between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. (Pacific time), seven days a week.

  • Province of BC Update on Reopening the Economy

    07 May 2020

    May 6, 2020

    BC’s Restart Plan lays out a series of steps that we will take together to protect people and ensure that our province can come back from COVID-19 stronger than before. Visit the Province of BC website to view BC's Restart Plan.

    Highlights of the Plan include:

    Phase 1: Essential Services Operations
    We are currently in Phase 1 of the 4 Phase Restart Plan.

    • Enhanced resources for hospitals and health care
    • Child care for essential workers
    • K-12: online and in-class learning
    • Non-essential businesses

    Phase 2: Under Enhanced Protocols
    Beginning in mid-May under enhanced protocols.

    • Starting May 19 more non-essential businesses will be allowed to open (hairdressers, bars, restaurants, etc.) in keeping with safe operations plans, supported by WorkSafeBC
    • Small social gatherings permitted
    • Elective surgeries and regulated health services like physiotherapy, dentistry, chiropractors and in-person counseling resume
    • Recall the provincial legislature for regular sittings
    • Expand in-person schooling K-12 (voluntary)
    • Provincial Parks:
      • May 14: provincial parks open for day-use only
      • June 1: many remaining facilities, including campgrounds, will reopen
      • A small number of parks that pose a health risk will remain closed
    • Re-Opening business:
      • Sectors that were ordered closed: asked to work with WorkSafeBC to develop plans to reopen safely
      • WorkSafeBC is developing industry-specific guidance
      • Any business restarting operations must ensure it is in compliance with the provincial health officer’s orders and in accordance with occupational health and safety guidance provided by WorkSafeBC

    Phase 3: Further Expanded Enhanced Protocols
    Roll out between June and September 2020 if transmission rates remain low or in decline.

    • Open additional businesses and services
      • More parks open, camping resumes
      • Film and TV production
      • Movie theatre
      • Personal services (spas and non-medical massage)
      • Hotels and resorts

    Phase 4: Treatment/Vaccine
    Achieved when the threat of COVID-19 has been significantly diminished.

    • Conditional on at least one of:
      • Wide vaccination
      • "Community" immunity
      • Broad successful treatments
    • Large gatherings (i.e. concerts and conventions)

    Click here for a WorkSafeBC Backgrounder.

    Click here for backgrounders on schools and parks.