Community Support & Recovery Plan

Supporting our Business Community

On May 5, City Council approved a Community Support and Recovery Plan (CSRP), that includes immediate relief for taxpayers and a recovery fund to address the pandemic’s short- and long-term financial impact on all sectors of the community. It includes:

• Deferring 2020 utility and property tax deadlines for all property types to Sept. 30;

• Designating $5-million to implement a response plan with both short- and long-term support for businesses, residents and non-profits;

• Seeking federal and provincial stimulus funding for City capital projects to promote economic recovery; and

• Additional measures to be included

Supporting our Business Community

On May 5, City Council approved a Community Support and Recovery Plan (CSRP), that includes immediate relief for taxpayers and a recovery fund to address the pandemic’s short- and long-term financial impact on all sectors of the community. It includes:

• Deferring 2020 utility and property tax deadlines for all property types to Sept. 30;

• Designating $5-million to implement a response plan with both short- and long-term support for businesses, residents and non-profits;

• Seeking federal and provincial stimulus funding for City capital projects to promote economic recovery; and

• Additional measures to be included in the 2021 budget.

City staff are now moving forward with refining the CSRP and a host of ideas are being considered, including targeted grants, reduced or waived City fees, technology investments and marketing to support local businesses. Staff plan to present specific CSRP recommendations to Council in late May.

Business Supports

We have more than 7,000 businesses in Coquitlam, ranging from home-based operations to large enterprises with hundreds of employees. The City recognizes that this is a very challenging time for many of our local businesses as they face the impacts and the uncertainty of the current public health crisis.

From the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Coquitlam’s Economic Development team has been reaching out to local business stakeholders and researching how best to support our community’s business sector. Over the coming weeks and months, City staff will continue to work with other levels of government, as well as business support organizations and other industry stakeholders, to help identify and inform our next steps.

This page has been developed to provide ongoing updates and information resources to Coquitlam’s business community. This will include opportunities for input, links to government and industry assistance programs, and a Q&A forum to get answers to your questions.

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  • B.C.’s strong fiscal response, economic foundation support people - Government of B.C.

    14 Jul 2020

    July 14, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic will mark British Columbians' lifetimes in ways never thought possible, and the Province is investing in people, businesses and communities to see them through the pandemic and build back better.

    “B.C. has made extraordinary investments in people and businesses through B.C.’s COVID-19 Action Plan and we will continue to provide the supports people need as the pandemic and the economic impacts evolve,” said Carole James, Minister of Finance.

    The B.C. government has released an economic and fiscal update for 2020-21 to provide a summary of COVID-19 investments to date, as well as a scenario of revenue and deficit projections.

    Government has supported people and businesses with $6.26 billion in COVID-19 supports to date. That includes the $5 billion in supplementary spending for B.C.’s COVID-19 Action Plan supports, such as workers benefits, rent supplements, income and disability assistance supports and economic recovery funding. These are in addition to $1.26 billion in other tax and relief measures for people and businesses, including the one-time increase to the climate action tax credit and property tax reductions for businesses.

    With the pandemic response for British Columbians, and a significant revenue decline due to the pandemic, the Province’s total operating deficit for 2020-21 could be $12.5 billion, based on projections developed by the Ministry of Finance.

    “B.C.’s safe restart plan is creating signs of hope for our economy as consumer confidence increases. These results have only been possible because of our strong public health measures,” James said. “As we continue our work to create a strong recovery, we also have an opportunity to build a stronger B.C. that works for everyone in our province.”

    British Columbia has made progress flattening the curve because of its strong health policy and a commitment to help keep each other safe. The Province is building an economic recovery plan that puts people first, with input from British Columbians, businesses and community organizations – so everyone has a good job and a secure future.

    “The pandemic has exposed underlying gaps in our economy and society,” James said. “We have been reminded of the need for strong public services and supports, workplace safety and our collective responsibility to take care of each other, and I’m looking forward to putting people’s input into action as we move forward with the economic recovery of our province.”

    As part of the COVID-19 Action Plan, $1.5 billion has been earmarked for economic recovery measures to be announced in September.

  • Canada Supports Inclusive Growth Through Economic Recovery - Government of Canada

    10 Jul 2020

    July 9, 2020

    The Government of Canada is committed to innovation and building a clean energy future. This commitment will be more important than ever as we begin to reopen the economy and plan our recovery from the COVID-19 crisis.

    The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources, today participated in the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Clean Energy Transitions Summit, the first IEA ministerial-level meeting entirely dedicated to the clean energy future. Minister O’Regan joined leaders from governments and industries around the world to discuss actions for sustainable recovery and clean energy technology innovation.

    Minister O’Regan led a ministerial session on inclusive growth, which focused on placing people and communities at the heart of economic recovery and the long-term transition to a clean energy future. In recognition of the unprecedented and extensive impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, he highlighted the importance of taking action to support workers and create the conditions for a more inclusive workforce.

    Governments and industries alike have an opportunity to create more equitable and inclusive employment growth. Mobilizing the participation of traditionally underrepresented groups, including women, youth, racialized groups and Indigenous peoples, will be vital to the post-COVID-19 recovery and long-term economic growth.

    Minister O’Regan also announced that Canada is leading the development of a reporting framework under the Equal by 30 initiative that will enable signatories to track and report on the concrete actions they are taking to close the gender gap across the energy sector. Led by Natural Resources Canada, Equal by 30 is a global campaign under the international Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) Initiative, a joint effort by the Clean Energy Ministerial and the International Energy Agency to advance gender equality in the energy sector. To date, close to 150 organizations across the energy sector, including governments, companies and non-profit institutions, have taken the Equal by 30 pledge.

    The government remains committed to building a clean energy future that will not only support our natural resource sectors through this tough economic time but also grow the economy and create good jobs.

  • Historic COVID-19 Plan Provides Canadians With the Support They Need to Get Through the Economic Crisis - Government of Canada

    13 Jul 2020

    July 8, 2020

    The COVID-19 crisis is the challenge of our generation. The Government of Canada has responded with rapid and broad-based emergency support measures to protect the health and economic well-being of Canadians.

    Today, Finance Minister Bill Morneau presented an economic and fiscal snapshot. The federal government has used its strong fiscal position to stabilize the economy and support Canadians by putting in place the largest economic aid package in generations.

    While the toll of COVID-19 on the broader economy in 2020 is expected to be the largest and most sudden economic contraction since the Great Depression, measures to flatten the pandemic curve in Canada are paying off, and efforts are underway across the country to safely and gradually reopen the Canadian economy. The actions and investments of governments across Canada to date have helped us get this far. But the road towards recovery remains long and uncertain. Today, and in the months to come, our economic health will largely depend on our public health.

    Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan is ensuring Canadians have the support they need to put food on the table and keep a roof over their head. Representing nearly 14 per cent of Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP), the Plan includes more than $230 billion in measures to protect the health and safety of Canadians and provide direct support to Canadians, businesses and other employers, and up to $85 billion in tax and customs duty payment deferrals to meet liquidity needs of businesses and Canadian families.

    With comparatively low levels of debt, the Government of Canada has the room to borrow and support the Canadian economy. In fact, even given Canada’s increased borrowing needs due to the COVID-19 response, public debt charges are expected to fall in 2020-21, as a result of historically low borrowing rates.

    Through responsible fiscal management, the government is building a bridge from an emergency to a safer place where we can build a more resilient economy for the future.

    The government will continue to ensure Canadians are supported through this crisis and stands ready to take additional actions to mitigate the impacts of the pandemic.

    Quotes

    “The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on the social and economic well-being of Canadians in every part of the country. For many it has meant lost jobs, lost hours and lost wages. Our government has understood, from the moment this pandemic began, that it was our role to step in to support Canadians and stabilize the economy. Our investments have meant that Canadians and Canadian businesses, instead of drowning in debt and closing up shop, will be better positioned to get back at it. As economies gradually and safely reopen, we will continue to ensure that Canadians have access to the support they need.”

    - Bill Morneau, Minister of Finance

    Quick facts

    Today’s economic and fiscal snapshot noted that:

    • As businesses and many sectors of the economy closed or curtailed their activities as a result of the pandemic, the Canadian and global economies took a severe hit. In Canada, 5.5 million Canadians – 30per cent ofthe workforce – either lost their jobs or saw their hours significantly scaled back over March and April.
    • Private sector economists expect an annualized decline of over 40 per cent in Canada’s real GDP in the second quarter of this year. They expect the economy to contract by 6.8 per cent in 2020 as a whole, its sharpest drop since the Great Depression, before rebounding by 5.5 per cent in 2021.
    • There are now growing signs that the worst of the economic shock is behind the Canadian economy, as the gradual and safe reopening of the economy continues. The shape of Canada’s economic recovery is uncertain and highly dependent on public health.
    • The decisive and substantial support providedthrough the government’s economic response planhelped prevent further costly damage to the Canadian economy by replacing the more than $40 billion lost in labour income, preventing the contractionin real GDPto reach over 10 per cent in 2020 and the unemployment rate to rise by a further 2 percentage points.
    • The temporary measures implemented through the government’s economic response plan will have a significant impact on the federal deficit.Coupled with the severe deterioration in the economic outlook, these result in a projected deficit of $343.2 billion in 2020-21.
    • While this year’s deficit estimate is elevated, the government’s response is in line with the fiscal response deployed by other comparator countries.Coming out of the crisis, Canada is expected to maintain its low debt advantage among G7 countries. The government’s commitment to maintaining this advantage will help ensure that future generations are not burdened with COVID-19 related debt.
  • Building a Bridge for Business - Government of Canada

    10 Jul 2020

    The government has taken immediate and decisive action to help keep Canadians employed and support businesses through this challenging time. Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan includes support for businesses of all sizes so that they can avoid layoffs, pay their employees and cover their rent.

    Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA)

    Small businesses and not-for-profits have access to the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA), which provides interest-free, partially forgivable loans of up to $40,000 and is offered through financial institutions, such as banks and credit unions, in cooperation with Export Development Canada.

    As of July 3, 688,000 applicants have been approved for CEBA for a total of $27.41 billion in funds disbursed, including $7 billion of which is forgivable if the loan is paid back before December 31, 2022. Over 65 per cent of the businesses eligible based on the payroll criteria have benefitted from the program.

    Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS)

    To help keep Canadians employed and support businesses, the government introduced the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) – a wage subsidy of 75 per cent for qualifying employers, up to $847 per week per employee, beginning March 15, 2020. The CEWS gives employers financial support so they can keep or re-hire their workers. The CEWS helps Canadians keep their jobs, and prepares businesses to rebound from the crisis in a strong position. To date, the program has supported about three million employees by helping them stay in the workforce or return to work.

    Taking into consideration the comments of key business and labour organizations during April and early May, the government announced on May 15, 2020 a proposal to extend the CEWS by an additional 12 weeks to August 29, 2020. The May 15 announcement also included a proposal to extend eligibility for the CEWS to a number of other types of employers that were not included previously.

    Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA)

    As Canadians take action in the fight against COVID-19, many small businesses have been forced to close entirely and as a result have struggled to pay rent. Together with the provinces and territories, the government introduced the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA), which helps lower rent for eligible small businesses by 75 per cent in April, May and June, with a one-month optional extension to cover July rent.

    As of July 3, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), the CECRA program administrator, has approved applications representing over 29,000 small businesses with over 209,000 employees, and total requested funding of over $221 million. In addition to thousands of applications by property owners in progress or being processed, CMHC is working closely with large property owners to complete applications to provide rent support to a further 25,000 small businesses.

    Local, Family-owned Restaurant

    Sammy owns a family-run restaurant that his parents opened when they immigrated to Canada.

    • In March, to comply with emergency measures, Sammy was forced to temporarily close the restaurant, and lay off the restaurant’s employees with no pay. Sammy’s restaurant never offered take-out or delivery, but, on April 19, Sammy decided to offer these services to the community, and was able to hire back four of his staff, each with a salary of $750 per week. Despite his efforts, Sammy experienced an average revenue decline of more than 70 per cent from April to June compared to the corresponding periods in 2019.
    • Sammy was very concerned about how to pay his $5,000 in rent. In late March, Sammy approached his property owner, Mary, about the possibility of reducing his monthly rent. While Mary was very sympathetic, and concerned about her ability to preserve her future rental revenue should Sammy lose his business, she was only able to defer a portion of Sammy’s rent given her own expenses to maintain the commercial property.
    • Sammy and Mary were able to access the CECRA. Mary obtained a forgivable loan from CMHC in the amount of $7,500, equal to 50 per cent of Sammy’s gross monthly rent for April, May and June, and is considering applying for the one-month extension to provide Sammy with a bridge to relaunch his business as the economy re-opens. Sammy and Mary equitably shared the remaining 50 per cent of Sammy’s monthly rent, reducing Sammy’s rental obligations to a more manageable $1,250 per month for the corresponding period.
    • Sammy was able to access the CEWS which provides a subsidy of 75 per cent of an employee’s salary to help him pay for his labour costs. For the months of April to early June, he received a total of $15,750 in CEWS support to pay his four employees.
    • Sammy was also able to access the Canada Emergency Business Account, an interest-free, partially forgivable loan of up to $40,000 to help pay non-deferrable operating expenses for his business, including the rent and payroll expenses remaining after receiving CECRA and CEWS. Through his financial institution, Sammy could also apply for the SME Loan and Guarantee Program under the Business Credit Available Program should he need additional financing.
    • In addition, Sammy has the flexibility to defer any payment of income tax amounts that become owing until after August 31, 2020, and was able to defer remittance of collected GST/HST and customs duties until June 30.

    Business Credit Availability Program (BCAP)

    Through the Business Credit Availability Program (BCAP), the government has ensured that credit and liquidity support is available to small and medium-sized businesses who need it. The Small and Medium Enterprise Co-lending Program allows eligible businesses to access up to $12.5 million in liquidity support, and a further loan of up to $6.25 million is available through the BCAP Guarantee Program. As of July 3, 148 guarantees have been confirmed for a total loan value of over $303.59 million. Based on the experience with similar products made available during the 2009 financial crisis, uptake of these programs is expected to grow steadily over time.

    The BCAP is also providing support tailored for mid-market businesses with larger financing needs from across the economy. Support for these businesses includes loans of up to $60 million per company and guarantees providing enhanced access to loans of up to $80 million. Access to financing supports ensures larger companies can pay the salaries of millions of Canadians these businesses employ, and support the suppliers who rely on their business.

    A Small Manufacturing Company

    Ali owns a small manufacturing corporation in Markham, Ontario that fabricates auto parts. 75 per cent of its output is exported. The company employs 25 full time employees, each earning an average monthly salary of $4,250. They have had a few large orders suspended, resulting in a 35 per cent revenue drop.

    The company was able to access the CEWS for wage subsidies of $79,688/month, for a total benefit of $239,063 for the period of March 15 to June 6, 2020 to maintain its workforce of 25 employees. It can defer any payment of income tax amounts that become owing until after August 31, 2020, giving the business more financial flexibility to address immediate needs. The company was also able to defer payments of GST/HST, as well as customs duty payments on imports, until June 30.

    Ali was also able to access the Canada Emergency Business Account, an interest-free, partially forgivable loan of up to $40,000 to help pay non-deferrable operating expenses for his business, including the rent and payroll expenses.

    Ali can also speak to his bank about existing business credit products and specific opportunities for relief. If his needs exceed the level of support Ali’s bank is able to provide, the bank could utilize the BCAP SME Loan and Guarantee Program that may offer up to $18.75 million of additional credit for the company.

    Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF)

    Canada’s large-sized companies employ millions of Canadians. The LEEFF program supports Canada’s largest employers, with annual revenues generally in the order of $300 million or higher and seeking financing of $60 million or more. Canada’s large-sized companies employ millions of Canadians. The government has put in place the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF) to help them get through this crisis so that they can continue to support their workers. The LEEFF offers significant bridge financing to firms whose needs during the pandemic are not being met through conventional financing. Applications for LEEFF have been received and are currently undergoing the necessary due diligence to protect taxpayers.

    The LEEFF is available to support Canadians working in sectors across the economy in a fair and consistent way. Companies that receive LEEFF funding are required to publish an annual climate-related financial disclosure report, provide information on how they are contributing to achieving Canada’s commitments under the Paris Agreement and goal of net-zero by 2050, and meet obligations under existing pension plans and collective bargaining agreements.

  • Support service helps over 4,200 businesses during pandemic - Government of B.C.

    09 Jul 2020

    The B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service has served more than 4,200 businesses through phone, chat and email since its launch in April 2020, and has had more than 200,000 visits to its COVID-19 web page.

    The support service is a crucial link that helps businesses navigate the supports and services offered by the provincial and federal governments, and industry and community partners, during the pandemic. It is operated by Small Business BC (SBBC), a not-for-profit organization that delivers a variety of services to B.C. businesses through financial support from the provincial and federal governments.

    “Businesses need the support service to help navigate the rapid pace of change during this pandemic,” said Michelle Mungall, Minister of Jobs, Economic Development and Competitiveness. “We greatly appreciate our partnership with SBBC and the work it does for the business community. The support service is invaluable, and it will continue to be in place during the economic restart so that businesses can get the support they need to re-open, provide jobs and contribute to our communities.”

    Numerous supports have been announced by the provincial and federal governments to support businesses that have been impacted by the pandemic. The B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service brings all the information together in one place, making it easy for businesses to access the resources they need.

    “This is a difficult time for businesses, but there’s help at hand,” said Tom Conway, CEO, Small Business BC. “We’ve established the support service to ensure that businesses are able to access and leverage all the supports they are eligible for, so that they can emerge successfully from the impacts of this pandemic.”

    In addition to the support service, SBBC continues to offer numerous other free and low-cost resources to help businesses succeed, including webinars and customized business advice, and the recently launched online non-medical Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Marketplace.

    The new online PPE directory has been put in place to help businesses find vendors who supply non-medical products, like hand sanitizer, masks and face shields. This further supports B.C.’s restart plan by creating safe workspaces for employees and helping customers return with confidence, knowing that the businesses they are visiting are taking the required precautions.

    "As a startup impacted by the aftermath of COVID-19, we were struggling to find government support programs that we qualified for until we got in touch with the B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service,” said Jonathan Kim, CEO of The Home Key, a professional workspace for the e-sports and gaming community in downtown Vancouver. "The staff were incredibly helpful and took the time to reconnect with our company as new support measures were deployed. With their insight, we managed to stay one step ahead on applications and are optimistic about the programs we applied for."

    Government remains committed to supporting B.C. businesses as they recover from the impacts of the pandemic.

    Quick Facts:

    • The B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service is supported by the B.C. government and the Government of Canada through Western Economic Diversification Canada.
    • Advisors are available Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Pacific time) at 1 833 254-4357.
    • Inquiries can also be emailed to covid@smallbusinessbc.ca, or raised on the live-chat feature available on SBBC’s dedicated website: https://covid.smallbusinessbc.ca
    • Support is available in multiple languages and a call-back feature is in place to help manage high call volumes.
    • Suppliers interested in being listed as a vendor in the non-medical PPE Marketplace can submit a request through SBBC to be part of the marketplace.

    Learn More:

    For more information on the B.C. Business COVID-19 Support Service, visit: https://covid.smallbusinessbc.ca

    For more information on the PPE Marketplace, visit: marketplace.smallbusinessbc.ca/ppe

    For more information on Small Business BC’s regular services, such as educational webinars, access to expert business advisors, and more small business resources, visit: https://smallbusinessbc.ca/

    For more information about BC’s Restart Plan, visit: www.gov.bc.ca/restartbc

  • B.C. government seeks input on how to spend $1.5 billion for 'stimulus and recovery' - Tri-City News

    18 Jun 2020

    The B.C. government plans to spend an additional six weeks consulting the public on how to spend $1.5 billion that it has set aside to help with "stimulus and recovery" from the COVID-19 pandemic, Premier John Horgan announced June 17.

    His government in March announced a $5 billion commitment to meet needs arising from the pandemic, including $3.5 billion that is already being provided to B.C. residents, and businesses.

    It has not determined how it will spend the remaining $1.5 billion despite what Horgan said has been more than 1,500 "outreach sessions," with business executives, labour leaders, community organizers and others. In total, government representatives have spoken with more than 20,000 people, he said.

    B.C. has about 314,000 people who are out of work, and many businesses are struggling to survive – something that demonstrates clear financial need. With about 90% of job losses in the service sector, which disproportionately employs women and youth, Horgan said those demographics have been hardest hit.

    Still, he defended not spending all of the money his government has set aside for stimulus and recovery, and instead getting more feedback, because "stimulus in a time when you're asking people to stay home is poorly spent resources," he said.

    Horgan hinted that much of the $1.5 billion in future spending could be spent to encourage tourism.

    "Destination British Columbia's plan for tourism, domestic tourism this summer, is not well spent if we have not yet come to a place where we can lift travel restrictions," he said.

    Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry had said that she did not want British Columbians to be travelling around the province at least until there have been at least two full incubation periods for the COVID-19 virus, or 28 days, after the May 19 Phase 2 reopening of sectors of the economy, such as hair salons and nail bars.

    The province has now gone beyond that time period, but Henry said on June 15 that lifting restrictions may not begin this week. Then again, "maybe" they will. The determining factor will be data.

    The three main ways that the B.C. government plans to interact with residents to get ideas and set priorities are:

    • online surveys;
    • responses to a report named Building B.C.'s Recovery, Together: Have Your Say; and
    • virtual town halls.

    "This is not about waiting another six weeks," Horgan said. "This is about six more weeks of discussions with British Columbians. We have been investing in every aspect of the economy, including tourism. We have a Destination BC advertising plan ready to kick off. We've been engaging with tourist operators, whether they be eco-tourist operators on the Central Coast, whether it be the Butchart Gardens here in Victoria. We've been talking to people about how can we maximize the benefits in this extraordinary time."

    While Horgan said that his government is having regular conversations with the federal government to "mesh" benefits, he would not commit to extending the temporary rental supplement past the end of June. That program provides $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents, and $500 per month for eligible households with dependents.

    Horgan similarly declined to clarify whether there will be any extension of the one-time $1,000 B.C. Emergency Response Benefit for workers that is accessible for those who are also on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). The CERB had been planned to end in early July but yesterday was extended by eight weeks.


    Still, he defended not spending all of the money his government has set aside for stimulus and recovery, and instead getting more feedback, because "stimulus in a time when you're asking people to stay home is poorly spent resources," he said.

    Horgan hinted that much of the $1.5 billion in future spending could be spent to encourage tourism.

    "Destination British Columbia's plan for tourism, domestic tourism this summer, is not well spent if we have not yet come to a place where we can lift travel restrictions," he said.

    Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry had said that she did not want British Columbians to be travelling around the province at least until there have been at least two full incubation periods for the COVID-19 virus, or 28 days, after the May 19 Phase 2 reopening of sectors of the economy, such as hair salons and nail bars.

    The province has now gone beyond that time period, but Henry said on June 15 that lifting restrictions may not begin this week. Then again, "maybe" they will. The determining factor will be data.

    The three main ways that the B.C. government plans to interact with residents to get ideas and set priorities are:
    •online surveys;
    •responses to a report named Building B.C.'s Recovery, Together: Have Your Say; and
    •virtual town halls.

    "This is not about waiting another six weeks," Horgan said. "This is about six more weeks of discussions with British Columbians. We have been investing in every aspect of the economy, including tourism. We have a Destination BC advertising plan ready to kick off. We've been engaging with tourist operators, whether they be eco-tourist operators on the Central Coast, whether it be the Butchart Gardens here in Victoria. We've been talking to people about how can we maximize the benefits in this extraordinary time."

    While Horgan said that his government is having regular conversations with the federal government to "mesh" benefits, he would not commit to extending the temporary rental supplement past the end of June. That program provides $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents, and $500 per month for eligible households with dependents.

    Horgan similarly declined to clarify whether there will be any extension of the one-time $1,000 B.C. Emergency Response Benefit for workers that is accessible for those who are also on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). The CERB had been planned to end in early July but yesterday was extended by eight weeks.


    B.C. has about 314,000 people who are out of work, and many businesses are struggling to survive – something that demonstrates clear financial need. With about 90% of job losses in the service sector, which disproportionately employs women and youth, Horgan said those demographics have been hardest hit.

    Still, he defended not spending all of the money his government has set aside for stimulus and recovery, and instead getting more feedback, because "stimulus in a time when you're asking people to stay home is poorly spent resources," he said.

    Horgan hinted that much of the $1.5 billion in future spending could be spent to encourage tourism.

    "Destination British Columbia's plan for tourism, domestic tourism this summer, is not well spent if we have not yet come to a place where we can lift travel restrictions," he said.

    Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry had said that she did not want British Columbians to be travelling around the province at least until there have been at least two full incubation periods for the COVID-19 virus, or 28 days, after the May 19 Phase 2 reopening of sectors of the economy, such as hair salons and nail bars.

    The province has now gone beyond that time period, but Henry said on June 15 that lifting restrictions may not begin this week. Then again, "maybe" they will. The determining factor will be data.

    The three main ways that the B.C. government plans to interact with residents to get ideas and set priorities are:
    •online surveys;
    •responses to a report named Building B.C.'s Recovery, Together: Have Your Say; and
    •virtual town halls.

    "This is not about waiting another six weeks," Horgan said. "This is about six more weeks of discussions with British Columbians. We have been investing in every aspect of the economy, including tourism. We have a Destination BC advertising plan ready to kick off. We've been engaging with tourist operators, whether they be eco-tourist operators on the Central Coast, whether it be the Butchart Gardens here in Victoria. We've been talking to people about how can we maximize the benefits in this extraordinary time."

    While Horgan said that his government is having regular conversations with the federal government to "mesh" benefits, he would not commit to extending the temporary rental supplement past the end of June. That program provides $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents, and $500 per month for eligible households with dependents.

    Horgan similarly declined to clarify whether there will be any extension of the one-time $1,000 B.C. Emergency Response Benefit for workers that is accessible for those who are also on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). The CERB had been planned to end in early July but yesterday was extended by eight weeks.


    His government in March announced a $5 billion commitment to meet needs arising from the pandemic, including $3.5 billion that is already being provided to B.C. residents, and businesses.

  • Coquitlam Residents Surveyed on New Shopping Habits

    15 Jun 2020

    June 15, 2020

    Coquitlam residents are being asked how the pandemic is changing how they shop, dine out and travel in a new survey.

    As part of its support for local businesses, the City is conducting a consumer survey at https://bit.ly/CQShoppingSurvey until June 30, 2020 to measure consumer confidence in Coquitlam and find out what measures may be required as shopping, in-person dining and travelling begin to re-open.

    The survey is one of many initiatives outlined in the City’s Economic Development COVID-19 Response and Recovery Action Plan, designed to support local businesses and help them manage the impacts of the pandemic.

    Share Your Experience to Help Businesses

    Insights gained from the survey will help Coquitlam’s businesses understand what they can do – while following the necessary public health restrictions – to encourage customers to return during the pandemic.

    The multiple-choice survey will take less than five minutes to complete and asks residents:

    ·How their shopping habits have changed;

    ·Their biggest concerns about visiting local businesses and attractions;

    ·Their comfort level with visiting local restaurants, stores, parks and other services and amenities;

    ·How much shopping they do online and in person for goods and services now versus pre-pandemic;

    ·What safety measures would make them comfortable visiting a local business;

    ·If they would be willing to pay a surcharge to support the required safety measures, and if so, how much;

    ·What type of vacation plans they have for this summer; and

    ·Where they typically find information about local business hours and operations during the pandemic.

    Survey respondents also have the option of providing anonymous demographic information and additional written comments.

    Strategic Support Provided to Businesses

    The survey results will add to the body of research the City’s economic development team is gathering to help the City provide strategic support to businesses, and to help businesses make informed decisions as they face the challenges of the pandemic. The City recently completed a survey of local businesses to identify their challenges and needs, with the results to be released later this month.

    City staff are also now conducting in-person outreach to Coquitlam businesses to discuss their needs and share the opportunities and resources available to them through both the economic development action plan and the City’s multi-sector Community Support and Recovery Plan.

    More initiatives to raise awareness and directly support businesses are planned in the coming weeks. Comprehensive information about opportunities and resources is available on the City’s Business Support Portal at www.letstalkcoquitlam.ca/business.

  • Outreach Campaign Offers Support to Coquitlam Businesses

    11 Jun 2020

    June 11, 2020

    Coquitlam’s Economic Development staff are hitting the pavement over the next two weeks to make sure local businesses know what supports are available to them during the pandemic.

    The outreach campaign is part of the City’s efforts to provide continuity and support to local businesses, many of which are struggling due to the COVID-19 outbreak. With a focus on the summer months ahead, staff will be updating businesses on the various initiatives and programs that can help them, including Coquitlam’s Temporary Outdoor Space Expansion Program.

    Opportunities for Businesses

    Businesses are encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities:

    • The City’s new simple and expedited process to set up temporary patios or outdoor retail space in as little as two days (see www.coquitlam.ca/patios);
    • Promotional opportunities, a free photo shoot and purchase of $100 worth of goods, services or gift cards for up to 10 businesses that are offering a Canada Day special or package (apply by June 21; details at www.coquitlam.ca/canadaday);
    • City purchases gift cards or prize packages worth $50 to $100 from local businesses for the 75 Days of Summer marketing campaign starting June 24 (contact 604-927-3913 or tourism@coquitlam.ca; selection is on a first-come, first-served basis);
    • The chance for up to 12 restaurants to have their takeout featured during this year’s virtual Summer Concert Series (details at www.coquitlam.ca/summerconcerts); and
    • Opportunities to support the class of 2020 by putting up free posters from the City and offering discounts and packages for local grads and their families (contact 604-927-3913 or tourism@coquitlam.ca for information).

    Resources for Businesses

    Resources available to Coquitlam businesses include:

    • Free promotion through the Tri-Cities #SupportLocal website www.wegotthistricities.com (click the I’m Open for Business button) and the Tourism Coquitlam website www.visitcoquitlam.ca (email tourism@coquitlam.ca with details for a free retail or restaurant listing);
    • Comprehensive information and resources through the City’s Business Support Portal at www.letstalkcoquitlam.ca/business;
    • Short-term and long-term initiatives to help businesses recover through the new Community Support and Recovery Plan, funded by an initial allocation of $5 million (see www.coquitlam.ca/csrp);
    • Updates and news for and about local businesses through Tourism Coquitlam’s Twitter feed, along with sharing of posts tagged @visitcoquitlam; and
    • Information and support from the Economic Development team, reached through 604-927-3913 or economicdevelopment@coquitlam.ca.

    A full list of business resources is also available at www.letstalkcoquitlam.ca/business.

    Additional Business Resources

    • Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce (www.tricitieschamber.com) – comprehensive COVID-19 Guidance and Resources page available to all Tri-Cities businesses
    • Government of Canada (www.canada.ca/covid19) – federal financial and economic support, including information on Canada’s Economic Response Plan, the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB), Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), wage subsidies, access to loans, and deferrals for income taxes, GST and duty payments
    • Province of BC (www.gov.bc.ca/covid19) – provincial benefits, including tax deferrals, arts and culture grants and resources
    • Small Business BC (covid.smalbusinessbc.ca) – COVID-19 support and resources for small businesses
    • Retail Council of Canada (www.retailcouncil.org/coronavirus-info-for-retailers/recovery-playbook/) – Retail Recovery Playbook to help retailers in their effort to recover from COVID-19
    • BC Economic Development Association (www.bceda.ca) – economic development and recovery information, including daily bulletins
    • Urban Development Institute (www.udi.bc.ca/udi-covid-19) – information for the development community
    • Destination BC (www.destination.bc.ca/covid-19) – resources for tourism-based businesses
    • Tourism Industry Association of BC (www.tiabc.ca/covid19) – resources including bulletins and webinars
    • Creative BC (www.creativebc.com/about-us/news/covid-19) – resources for the film sector and the creative industry
    • Government of Canada tender site (www.buyandsell.gc.ca) – opportunities for local businesses to bid on government contracts, including providing medical supplies
    • Province of BC Supply Hub (www.gov.bc.ca/supplyhub) – opportunities for local businesses to supply products and services in support of B.C.’s COVID-19 response

    Join Coquitlam’s Efforts to #SupportLocal

    The City of Coquitlam has joined the Tri-Cities #SupportLocal campaign to assist local businesses, many of which are struggling at this time. Coquitlam also strongly encourages residents to #SupportLocal for their shopping and meals; view business listings at www.wegotthistricities.com and www.visitcoquitlam.ca for a directory of 150+ Coquitlam restaurants offering takeout and delivery.

    See also our video to learn more about how you can support our local businesses.

  • Update Thursday June 11, 2020 - BC Restaurant and Foodservices Association

    11 Jun 2020
    supporting image

    We're here to lead the restaurant and foodservice industry through this COVID-19 crisis. Please visit our website www.bcrfa.com for current updates.


    Updated- Order of the Provincial Health Office

    Dr. Bonnie Henry issued a new public health order this morning that is effective immediately. The order removes the 50% capacity and allows operators to determine their capacity based on the ability to physically distance staff and patrons by 2 m. This will support the work we accomplished on patio extensions, those restaurants who are expanding their patios will now be able to come closer to their licensed capacity numbers with the use of a larger patio while still abiding by social distancing requirements.

    The order officially legislates the use of plexiglass partitions to create separation: provided that they are washable, rigid and impermeable. They can be floor, table or counter mounted or hung from the ceiling.

    Buffets/Self service are now allowed to open with certain regulations - hand-sanitizing must be available before any self-service stations.

    Limits re-confirmed for:
    - Events - no more than 50 people. Added: people leaving cannot be replaced with new people.
    - Table limit - 6 people max at a table or booth.

    This positive change is in direct response to the advocacy work of the Business Technical Advisory Panel, BCRFA and our industry partners ABLE and the BC Craft Brewers Guild.
    BCRFA greatly appreciates the ongoing work of the Provincial Health Officer, Attorney General David Eby, staff, and the LCRB to support our industry in this time of crisis.

    You can review the full order issued today by our Provincial Health Officer here: FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS AND LIQUOR SERVICE. JUNE 10, 2020


    Physical Distancing and Patio Extensions Explained

    This Friday, June 12, 2020 at 10:00AM the BC Restaurant & Foodservices Association and Alliance of Beverage Licensees (ABLE BC) are hosting a ZOOM webinar, for restaurants and licensees who are re-opening / have re-opened and have questions regarding physical distancing and temporary patio extensions.
    Format will be a 20 minute presentation and then an opportunity to ask questions.

    Pre-registration is not required, however space is limited to 300 participants. The session will also be recorded.
    Join Zoom Meeting
    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88357347958
    Meeting ID: 883 5734 7958

    Consumer Confidence Campaign

    We are looking for images and quotes from restauranteurs and Chefs.
    The BCRFA is pleased to be working with the Chefs’ Table Society of British Columbia on a consumer campaign. Below is one of the images that is being circulated through our social media channels, BCRFA, EatDrinkLocal, BCTastesBetter and ChefTableBC is sharing. Please send a high quality image and short quote along with name of your restaurant and who is in the image to membership@bcrfa.com to be included in this campaign.


    If you are not currently a member of the BCRFA and would like more information on becoming one, visit our website or email membership@bcrfa.com

    Visit our website for more information www.bcrfa.com. Please remember to tag our Facebook and our Instagram as you post updates about your business. We will post them, too.



  • Resources for restarting your business in the new normal - Small Business BC

    10 Jun 2020

    As British Columbia moves through the four phases of our Provincial Restart Plan, businesses across our province are tackling the challenges involved in adapting to the “new normal” of operating during a pandemic.

    Whether your business is getting ready to reopen, or you’re pivoting operations to service the new COVID economy, you don’t need to face these challenges alone. Small Business BC is here to help. We’ve got the tools and resources you need to weather these unprecedented times, and maybe even identify some potential areas for growth.


    How to safely reopen your business

    The health and safety of staff and customers must remain the top priority for businesses during the pandemic. Find resources and guidance to help develop your own COVID-19 safety plan. GET STARTED


    For many business owners, COVID-19 has forced a quick pivot to service a rapidly changing business landscape. Find resources and best practices to develop a successful business strategy for the months ahead.Restart planning and strategies. GET STARTED


    Marketing tips for communicating with your customers as you reopen

    Have you considered how to effectively communicate your reopening plans to your customers? Find resources and best practices for marketing in the time of COVID-19. GET STARTED


    Read our resource list for restarting your business

    Refer to Small Business BC’s resource list and find ways to reopen and manage your business operations in rapidly changing times. We’re here to help you get back to business. GET STARTED