Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan

On Dec. 14, 2020, Council approved a scope and process for the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood planning project. Planning started in early 2021 for the future Hazel-Coy neighbourhood on Burke Mountain, and will be completed in late 2022.

The Hazel-Coy neighbourhood plan will build on the Northwest Burke Vision (NBV), adopted in 2017 to guide growth in the 400-hectare (980-acre) area over the next three decades.

The extensive consultation and planning process will create a comprehensive neighbourhood plan for Hazel-Coy, that will include policies on what may be built, what infrastructure is needed, and design strategies.

How to Get Involved

  • Contact City staff with questions, feedback, or if you require special assistance to participate at hazelcoy@coquitlam.ca or 604-927-3400.

About the Neighbourhood

  • About 70 hectares (175 acres) in size, of which about 40 hectares (100 acres) is suitable for development.
  • Bounded by Hyde Creek to the south and east, the sloped Coquitlam River escarpment to the west, and the Provincial Park to the north.
  • NBV concept calls for up to 950 single detached and townhouses, a small neighbourhood hub, a school and connections to natural areas, trails, playgrounds and parks.
  • Anticipated future population: 2,750 people.

Stay Informed
To receive updates on this project, click on the Subscribe button at the top of this page.

On Dec. 14, 2020, Council approved a scope and process for the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood planning project. Planning started in early 2021 for the future Hazel-Coy neighbourhood on Burke Mountain, and will be completed in late 2022.

The Hazel-Coy neighbourhood plan will build on the Northwest Burke Vision (NBV), adopted in 2017 to guide growth in the 400-hectare (980-acre) area over the next three decades.

The extensive consultation and planning process will create a comprehensive neighbourhood plan for Hazel-Coy, that will include policies on what may be built, what infrastructure is needed, and design strategies.

How to Get Involved

  • Contact City staff with questions, feedback, or if you require special assistance to participate at hazelcoy@coquitlam.ca or 604-927-3400.

About the Neighbourhood

  • About 70 hectares (175 acres) in size, of which about 40 hectares (100 acres) is suitable for development.
  • Bounded by Hyde Creek to the south and east, the sloped Coquitlam River escarpment to the west, and the Provincial Park to the north.
  • NBV concept calls for up to 950 single detached and townhouses, a small neighbourhood hub, a school and connections to natural areas, trails, playgrounds and parks.
  • Anticipated future population: 2,750 people.

Stay Informed
To receive updates on this project, click on the Subscribe button at the top of this page.

Ask a Question

Have a question about the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan? Enter it here and the Project Team will respond.

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  • How did the city determine a projected population of 2750 in the new area based on proposed 950 new homes (I.e. less than 3 people per household). With the price of housing, and an associated need for basement-suite “mortgage helpers”, this projected population seems very low.

    AAA asked 2 months ago

    The Northwest Burke Vision (NBV) adopted in 2017 provides a framework for the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process.  Within the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood, the NBV calls for a mix of single family homes and townhouses. While it is indicated there is potential for approximately 950 new homes for the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood in the NBV, this will be further defined through the neighbourhood planning process to be responsive to changing market conditions, tenure, lifestyle preferences and community needs.  The projected population of 2,750 is calculated using an assumed occupancy rate of 3 people per household - this is based on an analysis of previous Census data on the townhousing and single family housing occupancy rates in Coquitlam.

  • Will the City of Coquitlam be working with the developer to increase the top of slope buffer zones over and above the minimum requirements between the existing north end of Oxford Street and Coy Ave.? A poor example of adequate buffer zones are the many creeks to the east of Coast Meridian and also between the new Hadleigh on the Park townhouse development and the edge of Hyde Creek ravine. The setbacks on the east side of Hyde Creek adjoining this townhouse complex do not provide sufficient space for the house privacy, wildlife or erosion control. A better example of adequate buffer zones was implemented behind the houses along Devonshire Ave. and Marguerite St.

    nighthawk asked 2 months ago

    Development within 50 metres of the top-of-bank of a watercourse located within the Northeast Coquitlam Area Plan (which includes the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood) triggers a Watercourse Protection Development Permit.

    Furthermore, any development in the City within 30 metres from the high water mark of a stream would typically be subject to a review under the Riparian Areas Protection Regulations (RAPR) of the Zoning Bylaw (Section 523). Under the RAPR, developers can either adopt the “simple assessment” Streamside Protection and Enhancement Area (SPEA) setbacks shown on QtheMap or hire a Qualified Environmental Professional to conduct a “detailed assessment” (which must be reviewed and approved by the Province) to determine the appropriate SPEA setback.  Setbacks derived under the RAPR detailed assessment methodology may incorporate additional setback measures that integrate slope stability setbacks (based on geotechnical engineering reports) and windfirm tree protection setbacks (based on reports provided by professional foresters) on top of the SPEA setback set out under that methodology.  An overview of the City’s Riparian Areas Policy for protecting fish habitat is provided here.  

    In addition, the City’s steep slope setbacks under Section 519 of the Zoning Bylaw, which could range from 8m-15m from the ravine top of bank, may also apply. 


  • Are commercial uses being planned in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood?

    asked 3 months ago

    The Northwest Burke Vision identified a local community node near Coast Meridian Road in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood, which may include limited commercial uses such as a daycare facility or a coffee shop.  Through the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process, we will be working with the community to create a vision for this node and identify activities, services and amenities that would be appropriate.

  • How did the city determine the location of the commercial node on Coast Meridian? Would commercial be able to be integrated into the neighbourhoods alongside houses instead of being separated?

    K. asked 3 months ago

    The Northwest Burke Vision (NBV) adopted in 2017 provides a framework for the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process and identifies a Community Node in proximity to Coast Meridian Road.  The specific location of the Community Node will be established through the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process.  

    As described in the NBV, the Community Node is intended to serve as a vibrant focal point in the neighbourhood, establish a character or identity for the neighbourhood, and provide opportunities for a range of neighbourhood-oriented activities, services and amenities. The guidelines established in the NBV for the Community Node include encouraging a thoughtful mix of community, commercial, civic, service and residential uses.

  • Will there be shopping and restaurant nodes included in this part of the Burke Mountain Expansion?

    JP asked 2 months ago

    The Northwest Burke Vision identified a local community node near Coast Meridian Road in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood, which may include limited commercial uses such as a daycare facility or a coffee shop.  Through the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process, we will be working with the community to create a vision for this node and identify activities, services and amenities that would be appropriate.

  • Are there any plans for the shooting range? As more and more trees come down the shots can be heard much more often and from further away. I can imagine that residents of this new neighborhood and others in the area will be affected by the increased noise of frequent gun shots.

    Dave42 asked 2 months ago

    The Port Coquitlam and District Hunting and Fishing Club is currently leasing Crown Land at 5000 Harper Road from the Province. Under the terms of this lease, the Club would be required to obtain Coquitlam City Council support for continuation of the lease every three years beginning in 2019. 

    In 2019, Coquitlam City Council supported the continuance of the Club’s lease for three years. However, as outlined in the accompanying Report to Council, the Club was also advised that their current operations (particularly the outdoor shooting range) would not be supportable over the medium to longer term as they are incompatible with the long term land use directions articulated in the Northwest Burke Vision, potential changes resulting from the development of the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan and the Pinecone Burke Provincial Park Management Plan.  

    The City recognizes the important role the Club plays as a valuable centre for recreation, leisure and law enforcement training and would, therefore, like to see the Club secure a stable, certain and long term future.  To this end, the City is prepared to support the Club in liaising with the Province to explore suitable alternative locations outside of the Urban Containment Boundary that can support the Club’s operations over the long term.  As part of the ongoing Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood planning process, the project team has also been closely engaging with the Club.

  • What will happen to the Hunting and Fishing Club in the area nearby? This club is one of the few in the Lower Mainland that allows for safe sport and recreational archery and shooting sports as well as a location for police to train. It is home to approximately 4000 members in the Lower Mainland and is active in the community (Como Lake Derby, Grist Goesen Hatchery, etc).

    RM2021 asked 3 months ago

    The Port Coquitlam and District Hunting and Fishing Club is currently leasing Crown Land at 5000 Harper Road from the Province. Under the terms of this lease, the Club would be required to obtain Coquitlam City Council support for continuation of the lease every three years beginning in 2019. 

    In 2019, Coquitlam City Council supported the continuance of the Club’s lease for three years. However, as outlined in the accompanying Report to Council, the Club was also advised that their current operations (particularly the outdoor shooting range) would not be supportable over the medium to longer term as they are incompatible with the long term land use directions articulated in the Northwest Burke Vision, potential changes resulting from the development of the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan and the Pinecone Burke Provincial Park Management Plan.  

    The City recognizes the important role the Club plays as a valuable centre for recreation, leisure and law enforcement training and would, therefore, like to see the Club secure a stable, certain and long term future.  To this end, the City is prepared to support the Club in liaising with the Province to explore suitable alternative locations outside of the Urban Containment Boundary that can support the Club’s operations over the long term.  As part of the ongoing Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood planning process, the project team has also been closely engaging with the Club.

  • How much, if any, of the housing in this project will be through BC housing in consideration of low income families?

    brianagh asked 3 months ago

    BC Housing develops, manages and administers a wide range of subsidized housing options across the province. Non-profit housing societies operate these subsidized housing on behalf of BC Housing and serve many low-income families. Generally, the City provides grants to housing societies when they propose new housing that serve low- to moderate-income households.  The City defines low-income households as those earning 50% or less than the median household income.  As we develop the draft Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan and its policies in the coming months, we will be exploring ways to encourage the provision of affordable housing options in the neighbourhood.

  • Will the City be permitting construction of the massive retaining walls seen in other parts of Burke Mountain. Apart from being truly unsightly, it has already been proven that they are susceptible to failure.

    Chandeleine asked 3 months ago

    In 2018, Council adopted new policies and guidelines to guide development on sloping sites following concerns about high retaining walls in steep areas.  These policies and guidelines focus on the viability and aesthetic quality of development on sloping sites, and are also intended to complement existing zoning, BC Building Code and engineering regulations that address slope stability, building integrity and safety concerns.  One of these policy changes was to establish maximum wall height restrictions in the Zoning Bylaw (i.e., up to 2.4 metres in height for one wall or a total maximum of 4.8 m if two are built). More information may be found in this Council Report or the Steep Slopes & Retaining Walls reference guide.

  • Is any of this going to be move-in ready before the middle school is ready? That would not be good.

    Stefanie LeBlanc asked 3 months ago

    The Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan process is expected to be completed in late 2022. After the Plan is adopted by Council, it will serve as a framework to guide growth and development in the neighbourhood (i.e., it is not a prescriptive ‘master plan’ that dictates exactly what can happen and when).  For properties in the neighbourhood with a new Official Community Plan land use designation and want to redevelop, they would be required to go through a rezoning and development application which will be subject to comprehensive staff review and public input.  The actual timing of development and construction would depend on other factors such as land ownership and assembly patterns. 

    Separate from this neighbourhood planning process, a joint Burke Mountain high/middle school site has been designated south-east of the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood near David Avenue and Soball Street. This joint site is a top priority for both the City and SD43 and preliminary planning has been underway for some time. SD43 is currently awaiting capital funding approval from the Province to build the joint school and is targeting it to be open for the 2023-2024 school year.