Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan

On Dec. 14, 2020, Council approved a scope and process for the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood planning project. Planning started in early 2021 for the future Hazel-Coy neighbourhood on Burke Mountain, and will be completed in late 2022.

The Hazel-Coy neighbourhood plan will build on the Northwest Burke Vision (NBV), adopted in 2017 to guide growth in the 400-hectare (980-acre) area over the next three decades.

The extensive consultation and planning process will create a comprehensive neighbourhood plan for Hazel-Coy, that will include policies on what may be built, what infrastructure is needed, and design strategies.

How to Get Involved

About the Neighbourhood

  • About 70 hectares (175 acres) in size, of which about 40 hectares (100 acres) is suitable for development.
  • Bounded by Hyde Creek to the south and east, the sloped Coquitlam River escarpment to the west, and the Provincial Park to the north.
  • NBV concept calls for up to 950 single detached and townhouses, a small neighbourhood hub, a school and connections to natural areas, trails, playgrounds and parks.
  • Anticipated future population: 2,750 people.

Stay Informed
To receive updates on this project, click on the Subscribe button at the top of this page.

On Dec. 14, 2020, Council approved a scope and process for the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood planning project. Planning started in early 2021 for the future Hazel-Coy neighbourhood on Burke Mountain, and will be completed in late 2022.

The Hazel-Coy neighbourhood plan will build on the Northwest Burke Vision (NBV), adopted in 2017 to guide growth in the 400-hectare (980-acre) area over the next three decades.

The extensive consultation and planning process will create a comprehensive neighbourhood plan for Hazel-Coy, that will include policies on what may be built, what infrastructure is needed, and design strategies.

How to Get Involved

About the Neighbourhood

  • About 70 hectares (175 acres) in size, of which about 40 hectares (100 acres) is suitable for development.
  • Bounded by Hyde Creek to the south and east, the sloped Coquitlam River escarpment to the west, and the Provincial Park to the north.
  • NBV concept calls for up to 950 single detached and townhouses, a small neighbourhood hub, a school and connections to natural areas, trails, playgrounds and parks.
  • Anticipated future population: 2,750 people.

Stay Informed
To receive updates on this project, click on the Subscribe button at the top of this page.

Ask a Question

Have a question about the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan? Enter it here and the Project Team will respond.

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  • What types of recreation and tourism uses are being considered for the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood?

    asked 1 day ago

    The Northwest Burke Vision designates the northern portion of the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood (bordering Pinecone Burke Provincial Park) for recreation and tourism uses. This area will serve as a buffer between the Provincial Park and neighbourhood development. Through the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process, we will be working with the Province and the community to create a vision for this recreation and tourism area, including identifying amenities and activities that are appropriate and compatible with the Provincial Park and neighbouring development.

  • Are new schools being planned in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood?

    asked 1 day ago

    During the 2017 Northwest Burke Vision process, School District 43 (SD43) identified the need for an elementary school site in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood. The specific location will be determined through the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process in consultation with SD43 based on school siting best practices, with consideration given to establishing a connection between the school site with the community node. 

    Separate from this neighbourhood planning process, a joint Burke Mountain high/middle school site has been designated south-east of the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood near David Avenue and Soball Street. This joint site is a top priority for both the City and SD43 and preliminary planning has been underway for some time. SD43 is currently awaiting capital funding approval from the Province to build the joint school and is targeting it to be open for the 2023-2024 school year.

  • Are commercial uses being planned in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood?

    asked 1 day ago

    The Northwest Burke Vision identified a local community node near Coast Meridian Road in the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood, which may include limited commercial uses such as a daycare facility or a coffee shop.  Through the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process, we will be working with the community to create a vision for this node and identify activities, services and amenities that would be appropriate.

  • Will impacts on the environment, nature and wildlife be considered as part of the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process?

    asked 1 day ago

    Certainly. The Northwest Burke Vision provides a framework for the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process and outlines the need to protect important sloped terrain and fish, wildlife and plant habitat.  During this planning process, the project team will be closely engaging with environmental interest groups such as Burke Mountain Naturalists and Coquitlam River Watershed Roundtable.  When adopted, the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan would define natural and environmentally sensitive areas, and establish policies related to developing near steep slopes, reducing human-wildlife conflicts, protecting watercourses and reducing wildfire risks.  

    In addition, the City has in place environmental protection measures at the time of site development (i.e., following adoption of a neighbourhood plan), such as the Riparian Areas Regulation to protect fish habitat.

  • Why has a future northward extension of Oxford Street been identified?

    asked 1 day ago

    A future northward extension of Oxford Street was originally planned in the late 1980s as part of the Parkridge Estates subdivision.  Recent City studies (e.g., Strategic Transportation Plan, Northwest Burke Vision) have reconfirmed the need for this extension which will be a future collector street.   

    The Oxford Street extension, which will be built if and when development occurs, is intended to:

        promote transportation route choice for motorists, pedestrians and cyclists which will help reduce congestion and delays;

        provide a parallel collector corridor which will also provide opportunities for expanded transit routing; and

        increase safety and efficiency of the road network by providing alternative access for emergency services.

  • How much land in Hazel-Coy neighbourhood is developable?

    asked 1 day ago

    The geographic area of the Hazel-Coy Neighbourhood Plan is about 70 hectares (175 acres) and is located east of the Coquitlam River Escarpment, west of Hyde Creek, and bordered by Pinecone Burke Provincial Park to the north. Based on analysis done during the Northwest Burke Vision process, around half of the Hazel-Coy area has physical constraints that make development a challenge due to setback requirements from steep slopes, debris run off areas, wildfire risk zones, environmental setbacks, and floodplains.  The resulting developable land is approximately 40 hectares (99 acres) and will be confirmed through further site and geotechnical analysis as part of this neighbourhood planning process.

  • What is a Neighbourhood Plan?

    asked 1 day ago

    A Neighbourhood Plan provides direction for future development of a particular neighbourhood. It defines the type and location of housing and commercial buildings in the neighbourhood, identifies natural and recreation areas, plans for needed community facilities, and outlines pedestrian and cycling networks.  A Neighbourhood Plan will also specify the land use designations of properties in the neighbourhood.

  • Why is the City undertaking the Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process?

    asked 1 day ago

    In 2017, Council adopted the Northwest Burke Vision (NBV) which was developed through extensive public engagement and provided a framework for growth in the area. As part of this Vision, Hazel-Coy was identified as the first neighbourhood planning phase in the NBV area (see Section 6.2). The Hazel-Coy neighbourhood planning process was subsequently identified as a priority item in the City’s 2021 Business Plan, and Council endorsed the scope and process for this project in December 2020.

  • Where can I find a detailed map showing the area of hazel / coy topography showing proposed housing, roads, bridges, hiking/biking trails, parks, play grounds, etc.

    Brauser asked 26 days ago

    Hi there - Thanks for reaching out and our apologies for the delay in getting back to you! If you click on the "documents" tab on the right and look at the Northwest Burke Vision, there are a number of maps in there showing the area, the topography, and some conceptual maps (keeping in mind this document was in a very early visioning stage). 

    We are still developing the proposed land use for the area (which would identify some of those elements you've listed), which will be presented for feedback later in this engagement process. To stay in the loop, I encourage you to sign up for project updates if you haven't already by clicking the "subscribe" button on the top right. 

  • Will the right-of-way for the existing portion of Oxford Street north of David Avenue be widened?

    asked 1 day ago

    The City does not have any plans to widen the right-of-way for the existing portion of Oxford Street. Generally, there will still be one through lane in each direction except that a dedicated south-bound left turn lane may be provided at the David Avenue intersection, similar to what has been done on the south side of the intersection.  

    In addition, the City has engaged a transportation consultant to undertake a design review of Oxford Street that will explore opportunities to improve traffic safety and reduce vehicle speeds where appropriate.