Environmental Sustainability Plan

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Thank you to everyone who participated in the development of the Environmental Sustainability Plan. View the final document at coquitlam.ca/enviroplan.

The City has approved its first draft Environmental Sustainability Plan (ESP). This plan will incorporate the City’s environmental goals, objectives and actions into one overarching strategy that will provide a clear and flexible framework to help guide future decisions, ensuring the long-term resiliency and sustainability of our community.

Development of the ESP

The ESP was developed through comprehensive research and analysis, as well as through extensive public engagement, over a four-phase process that began in spring 2019. In total, through the entire project development, the team had more than 1,600 survey responses, more than 4,500 comments and 35 pop-up, in-person or virtual engagement opportunities. Thank you to everyone who provided their feedback on this important project.

Stay Informed

Stay up-to-date on the Environmental Sustainability Plan by subscribing for updates on the project by entering your email into the Stay Informed box in the top right corner.

The City has approved its first draft Environmental Sustainability Plan (ESP). This plan will incorporate the City’s environmental goals, objectives and actions into one overarching strategy that will provide a clear and flexible framework to help guide future decisions, ensuring the long-term resiliency and sustainability of our community.

Development of the ESP

The ESP was developed through comprehensive research and analysis, as well as through extensive public engagement, over a four-phase process that began in spring 2019. In total, through the entire project development, the team had more than 1,600 survey responses, more than 4,500 comments and 35 pop-up, in-person or virtual engagement opportunities. Thank you to everyone who provided their feedback on this important project.

Stay Informed

Stay up-to-date on the Environmental Sustainability Plan by subscribing for updates on the project by entering your email into the Stay Informed box in the top right corner.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    I would like to know why City of Coquitlam does not adapt the step code/passive house standard/LEED. Is it because the city wants the fast growth (easy to build buildings) to collect the tax? Thank you,

    Jae asked almost 3 years ago

    Hello, thank you for your question! 

    The current BC Building Code (2018) contains new regulations for energy efficiency in new buildings. The City of Coquitlam follows the BC Building Code to ensure energy efficiency requirements are achieved. Many developers choose to design their buildings with energy efficiency in mind and are able to use the BC Energy Step Code performance pathway as an alternative to meet these requirements. The voluntary requirements of the BC Energy Step are expected to come into regulation through the BC Building Code to to support making buildings net-zero energy ready by 2032.


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    Why does the city of Coquitlam allow developers to take down big, tall (30' & higher) coniferous trees on suburban lots. Then they do not replace them with new coniferous trees? They sometime plant short deciduous trees and shrubs that do not even have remotely the potential replacement ability of the previous trees on said lot and of cleaning or cooling the air? What is Coquitlam's plan moving forward?

    John asked over 2 years ago

    Hello, and thanks for your question!

    The City provides developers with the City’s Tree Replacement List, which includes both deciduous and coniferous tree species. Additionally, tree replacement plans consider selecting the right trees for the right location, and large coniferous species are not typically suited for small residential lots. 

    The City of Coquitlam Tree Management Bylaw # 4091 (2010) regulates the conservation, removal and replacement of trees in the city and the Zoning Bylaw # 3000 (1996), sets out landscaping requirements as a condition of development. In addition to the Tree Management Bylaw, the City’s Development Permit Guidelines Section 2.5.2 provides additional guidance on landscaping and vegetation. 

    If you are interested in the details of the bylaws and guidelines listed above, here are a few links:

    Tree Management Bylaw

    Zoning Bylaw 

    Development Permit Guideline Areas


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    Are recycled content minimums part of the city's procurement strategy for items such as office paper?

    daylen asked over 2 years ago

    The standard office paper procurement policy is to acquire paper that contains a minimum of 30% recycled content.


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    What progress has the City made in switching streetlights to LED bulbs? When is the transition expected to be completed?

    daylen asked over 2 years ago

    The City has completed Phase 1 in a project to upgrade all city-owned streetlighting to LED. This project has 5 phases, and is expected to be completed in 2023.


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    Are any City-owned buildings currently built to LEED standards? Will new City buildings be required to meet these guidelines?

    daylen asked over 2 years ago

    The City has one building, Poirier Sports and Leisure Centre (PSLC) Pool, that has achieved a LEED Silver rating. Facilities built since 2008 have applied some LEED guidelines and general best practices in construction to achieve efficient design and performance. Some of these include PSLC Arena, Burke Mountain Fire Hall, and Town Centre Fire Hall Administration Building.

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    Where does the material from our green carts go for composting? What method is used?

    daylen asked over 2 years ago

    Thank for your question! Green cart waste is processed at a commercial composting facility called Net Zero Waste located in the Fraser Valley. The system involves covering the organics under a large specialized tarp made of Gore-Tex, which promotes the biological composting process. For more information about this process, you can visit: http://www.netzerowasteabbotsford.com/gore-cover-system 


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    Hello there. I was wondering what is being done to promote connectivity of wild spaces, since this is a major factor affecting bear encounters

    Brian asked over 2 years ago

    Hi, thanks for your question! Green corridors are considered as part of the City’s development review process, its bylaws, policies and guidelines, including the Urban Design ​and Development Permit Areas (CWOCP, Part 4)​ and the Zoning Bylaw as it applies to the Riparian Area Regulation. Exploring options for improving the continuity of wildlife corridors to manage human-wildlife conflict will be considered as part of the development phase of the Strategic Environmental Sustainability Plan. 

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    From an online submission: I was wondering if there are any plans for significant carbon reduction requirements for new, upcoming or rezoned buildings planned for the City of Coquitlam. With the number of projects, especially the high-density multi-family projects, planned for the Coquitlam Centre area the GHG emissions could be significantly reduced by requiring the use of energy recovery options, such as recovering energy from wastewater, to significantly reduce the use of fossil-fuel burning boilers for domestic hot water and space heating.

    RVaughan asked over 2 years ago

    The City of Coquitlam takes a lens of sustainability in the design of their new facilities and in retrofitting their existing facilities. Since 2008, every new facility undergoes modelling for energy performance and prioritizes GHG savings in equipment selection. The City’s facility and energy management teams work closely to ensure the best technologies are selected for every energy-related project. An upcoming new construction project, Place Maillardville, will be designed to use 100% electrical energy which means significantly lower emissions than the building it is replacing. The City also has two energy-sharing systems serving 5 facilities that use waste heat recovery as the primary source of heating.

    On the community level, the City follows the BC Building Code to ensure energy efficiency requirements are achieved. Many developers choose to design their buildings with energy efficiency in mind and are able to use the Energy Step Code performance pathway as an alternative to meet energy efficiency requirements. This could include energy recovery or low GHG emissions technologies to achieve the standard.


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    From the Universal Access-Ability Advisory Committee: Is Coquitlam starting from scratch on the Environmental Sustainability Plan or did you look at what other cities and countries are doing?

    RVaughan asked almost 3 years ago

    Phase I of the Environmental Sustainability plan development included research and review of other Metro Vancouver municipalities who have developed similar plans; including interviews with staff from these municipalities to learn from their experience.

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    From the Universal Access-Ability Advisory Committee: Are all City departments on board with developing the ESP?

    RVaughan asked almost 3 years ago

    Developing the ESP is a corporate priority for the City and will include the involvement of a wide variety of City staff. The ESP project leads are supported by an interdepartmental Project Support Team that includes representatives from various other City departments, including but not limited to: Engineering & Public Works, Planning & Development, Parks, Rec & Culture, Civic Lands & Facilities, and Corporate Communications. The members of the project support team will provide input and feedback at each phase of the ESP plan development and will help ensure that the final plan aligns with our city-wide goals across all departments.