Southwest Housing Review

The Southwest Housing Review (SWHR) is a multi-year planning effort to support the provision of more diverse housing options in Southwest Coquitlam. The project consists of four streams of work, which are:

  • A review of neighbourhood pockets where residents have come forward requesting a review of the land use designation of their neighbourhood;
  • Creation of a Corridor Development Strategy (CDS) for key arterial streets;
  • A review of the potential expansion of the recently updated Housing Choices Program into other areas of Southwest Coquitlam; and
  • A review of infill housing options in single-family areas to further address the policy directions in the Southwest Coquitlam Area Plan.

Learn more and share your feedback
on the Neighbourhood Pockets.

How to Share Your Input

Stay Informed
To receive updates on this project, click on the Subscribe button at the top of this page.

The Southwest Housing Review (SWHR) is a multi-year planning effort to support the provision of more diverse housing options in Southwest Coquitlam. The project consists of four streams of work, which are:

  • A review of neighbourhood pockets where residents have come forward requesting a review of the land use designation of their neighbourhood;
  • Creation of a Corridor Development Strategy (CDS) for key arterial streets;
  • A review of the potential expansion of the recently updated Housing Choices Program into other areas of Southwest Coquitlam; and
  • A review of infill housing options in single-family areas to further address the policy directions in the Southwest Coquitlam Area Plan.

Learn more and share your feedback
on the Neighbourhood Pockets.

How to Share Your Input

Stay Informed
To receive updates on this project, click on the Subscribe button at the top of this page.

Ask a Question

Have a question about the Southwest Housing Review? Or about Southwest Coquitlam housing, neighbourhoods or transportation? Enter it here and the Project Team will endeavour to respond within 2 business days.

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  • My house is currently along McKinnon Street, Coquitlam. I am hoping to build a laneway house in the back laneway. The lot is about 8600 sqft so I have plenty of space to build one. Why is my property not given a fair opportunity to build one while other properties along Austin Ave already have? Will the housing program be expanded in Mckinnon St in the near future?

    Derek asked about 1 month ago

    Hi There! Thank you for reaching out to the SWHR Team!

    You raise a very good point. There are many properties throughout Southwest Coquitlam that are large enough to potentially accommodate modest infill development such as laneway housing, but where current rules and policies do not allow it.

    As part of the 5th phase of the Southwest Housing Review (SWHR), we will be examining opportunities to expand the Housing Choices Program (which allows for modest forms of attached housing such as duplex, triplex, fourplex and multiplex) and infill single-family housing (including options such as smaller lots and laneway housing) across Southwest Coquitlam. This phase of the SWHR is tentatively scheduled to begin in 2022.


  • We are located on Blue Mountain (arterial) - with the Burquitlam side already rezoned. We reside on the Mailardville side and see quite a contrast in the property values given the zoning on our side. Is the intent to rezone arterial streets in a similar fashion when in two different regions?

    Allison asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The short answer to your question is: Potentially yes, however no specific land use changes have been proposed at this time.

    As part of the 2017 Burquitlam-Lougheed Neighbourhood Plan (BLNP), a short stretch of properties on the west side of Blue Mountain St was designated for future townhousing development. I believe this is the area to which you are referring. At that time, this was determined to be an appropriate form of housing land use along this particular stretch of this particular corridor, but was limited by the boundaries of the BLNP.

    The Corridor Development Strategy will provide an overall vision and policy guidance for future land uses along key arterial streets in Southwest Coquitlam and identify opportunities to transform those arterials into “complete streets” that encourage healthy and sustainable transportation choices.

    - Southwest Housing Review Team

  • I live on the north side of Brookmere Ave, between the watercourse east of Bosworth St. and the Vancouver Golf Club east of Denton St. During the May 10 council meeting, council members appeared to be in favour of rezoning the Whiting-Appian pocket. While the southwest quadrant between Whiting and Bosworth is in favour of being designated high-density, the proposals only give my southeast quadrant a designation of medium density transitioning down to Denton. Given how high-rises are also proposed for the area south of Brookmere may I inquire as to the reasoning for transitioning the southeast quadrant down and enclosing it with tall structures on 3 sides (there will be highrises to the west and south of this quadrant, while the east will be obscured by trees from the Vancouver Golf Club and Brookmere Park) as opposed to also making this southeast quadrant higher density to match the height of the surrounding structures? I feel this would make the southeast quadrant rather claustrophobic.

    Thomas Lu asked 4 months ago

    Hi there and thanks for the question!

    At this time, the land use concept for the Whiting Way / Appian Way Neighbourhood Pocket (WW/AW) is in draft and we will be welcoming feedback on how it might be improved during upcoming public consultation. That said, I am happy to provide the rationale that has led to the land use concept in its current form. I hear your concern that the land use proposal for your area my appear to be inconsistent with nearby land uses. Perhaps this explanation will help to clarify how the different land uses are envisioned to fit together.

    In general, the concept for the WW/AW Neighbourhood Pocket envisions transitioning building heights and densities downward from the southwest toward the east and north. Austin Creek will form a natural boundary where it is appropriate to transition down to shorter and less dense buildings. It’s worth noting that, while the properties located between Bosworth Street and Austin Creek are proposed to be designated High Density Apartment Residential, this land is proposed to become a linear park, with the allotted density shifted to sites west of Bosworth. This will create a more substantial area of greenspace between the high-density buildings to the west and the medium-density buildings to the east.

    In order to achieve the linear park, as well as the proposed road realignments that are identified in the concept, development west of Austin Creek will be more complex and require more substantial land assemblies and comprehensive planning than is typically the case for many building sites. This greater level of complexity is better suited to high density development. 

    In regards to the to the properties on the south side of Brookmere Avenue. At this time, no specific development concept or proposal has yet been submitted for these properties. That said, due to their shallow lot depth and the presence of creeks, it is unlikely that development would result in tall towers at this location. Additionally, as redevelopment permits, the land use concept also envisions the conversion of this stretch of Brookmere Avenue into a green link, connecting the proposed Austin Creek linear park to Brookmere Park to the southeast. Therefore, the proposed medium density housing on the north side of Brookmere Avenue is envisioned to be surrounding predominantly by greenspace, rather than tall towers.

    Again, I would like to reiterate that the land use concept is still in draft and I invite you to participate in the upcoming public consultation for WW/AW.

    To ensure you’re getting the latest information, I encourage you to subscribe to the Southwest Housing Review via the City’s email subscription service HERE.

  • Why our plans can't focus on environmental friendly neighborhoods with buildings nice to look it. Like New Port village? All this ugly box like high rises killing our beautiful surroundings. Over all our roads was designed with less traffic now it's jammed with traffic. Please don't be greedy and don't force single home owners out Coquitlam!

    Mrs Elizabeth Bikas asked 4 months ago

    Hi Elizabeth,

    Thank you for taking the time to engage with us!

    Your comments really speak to the need to plan in advance to ensure that development fits appropriately into the surrounding community. We often look to precedents such as Newport Village in Port Moody as examples of how to create vibrant neighbourhoods with attractive buildings and the right mix of uses.

    The Southwest Housing Review (SWHR) consists of four different work streams, each looking at housing opportunities in different areas of Southwest Coquitlam. It is important to note that, with the exception of one neighbourhood pocket which is located close to SkyTrain, we do not anticipate any new areas for high-rise apartments as part of this review. In most instances, we are looking at opportunities to allow smaller-scale housing types.

    I hear your concern about the prospect of home owners being forced out of their homes. Understand that any changes that would occur will be an update of what is permitted (heights, densities, land uses, etc..) and it will be up to property owners to decide whether they wish to make changes to their property, move or stay put.

  • re Burquitlam-Lougheed, I want my block to remain as one family residential. In the previous & fairly recent community review, there was talk of 'potential' looking again at the block between Whiting & Bosworth for higher density. Now suddenly the higher density proposals go all the way up to Denton. Why are we being pressured by developers and land assembly brokers to change our zoning plans. If everyone doesn't agree & you force changes for our block, what happens then? I do not want any of this. I bought this property to live in it & I appreciate the single family housing pocket in this area. So, will you go ahead with this even if there isn't 100% agreement?

    ThatsAHardPass asked 5 months ago

    Hi and thanks for the question.

    The block you’ve referenced is part of a larger review of the area bounded by Whiting Way to the west, the lane behind Ebert Ave in the north, Denton St. to the east and Brookmere Ave. to the south (and is referenced as Whiting-Appian Neighbourhood Pocket in our materials). It is one of six “neighbourhood pockets” undergoing a land use review. 

    This area was identified in the Burquitlam Lougheed Neighbourhood Plan in 2017 as a “Future Planning Area” and Council has since initiated the review of land uses in this area. As you’re probably aware, the City solicited input from residents to understand their opinions about the future of the area and have we’ve since summarized those as part of an update back in February.

    I hear your concern about your enjoyment of your present property. Understand that any changes that would occur will be an update of what is permitted (heights, densities, land uses, etc..) and it will be up to property owners to decide whether they wish to make changes to their property, move or stay-put. 

    This work is guided by Council, City policies and plans (eg. Burquitlam Lougheed Neighbourhood Plan, the Official Community Plan, Housing Affordability Strategy, etc..) as well as resident input, which was received last fall (you can see those results in HERE). 

    To ensure you’re getting the latest information, I encourage you to subscribe to the Southwest Housing Review via the City’s email subscription service HERE

    Cheers,

    Southwest Housing Review Team

  • My house is at 814 Stewart, Coquitlam, with the land of ​​12,400 square feet. I hope to follow the city planning to build affordable houses , small houses, roll houses, or townhouses. Because we really don’t need a big house, and we can’t afford such a big and expensive house, hope

    Judy Iok Kio Lam asked 5 months ago

    Hello Judy—thanks for the note. 

    The focus this year is on the Neighbourhood Pockets and Corridor Development Strategy workstreams. Phase 5, which is focused on the Housing Choices program, will address opportunities for the majority of Southwest Coquitlam properties, so we encourage you to stay tuned. Subscribing to this page through the subscription link on the top right of the page, or via Coquitlam's email subscription service--here--will ensure you always receive the most up-to-date information.

    Cheers,

    Southwest Housing Review Team


  • With the housing choice program, with the coach homes, what would happen if a lot didn't have a back lane. Would they lose the option of building one?

    JC asked 9 months ago

    Thank you for your question, JC!

    The Housing Choices program does permit backyard suites on properties without a lane. The Housing Choices Program references two types of “backyard suites”: carriage homes and garden cottages. The former refers to suites located above a backyard garage where a lane exists; the latter refers to suites in a single storey building on properties without lane access.

  • Would the moratorium of 5500sqft home on a RS-1 zone be lifted at the end of this review?

    JC asked 9 months ago

    Thank you for your question, JC!

    Officially, the maximum 5,500 sq.ft. floor area limitation is not a moratorium; it is a permanent regulation in the Zoning Bylaw and applies to all single-family dwellings in Southwest Coquitlam. As a part of the Southwest Housing Review, we will review opportunities to refine the City’s approach to limiting house sizes in Southwest Coquitlam.

  • Are there any plans to also look at net zero homes or passive homes, and implementing some sort of incentives for these significantly more efficient homes to be built?

    JC asked 9 months ago

    Thank you for your question Jason. 

    While the Southwest Housing Review is not directly exploring incentivizing net-zero or passive house building standards, other overlapping City policy work is examining how the City can increase the energy performance of buildings in the city. For example, Staff are working on the implementation of the BC Energy Step Code, which has much stronger energy performance and sustainability requirements than the current BC Building Code. You can learn more about these efforts in the most recent report to council on this matter from October 2020, available HERE

    Additionally, the implementation of the City’s forthcoming Environmental Sustainability Plan may also have implications on the types of green building policies the City develops in the future. You can learn more about the Environmental Sustainability Plan project HERE



  • What are the city plans for Lanehomes in the Burquitlam Lougheed area . At the moment my neighbourhood is changing rapidly. 52 storey high-rises, huge homes at 6000 plus sq. ft with basement suites , yet in my opinion the city seems to neglect the concept of a Lanehome in this area. My home is within a 10 min brisk walk of 2 skytrain stations and no plans to OK Lanehomes?? yet the Millardville area has these homes and no skytrain station in the area. Could you explain , in my opinion ,this strange city planning.

    Keith D asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to engage with us on the Southwest Housing Review (SWHR)!

    Your comments really get to the heart of one of the major objectives of the SWHR, which is to identify other areas where modest change and increases in density might be appropriate.

    As part of the Housing Choices Expansion component of the project, we will be examining opportunities to introduce attached forms of housing (e.g., duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes) into additional areas, beyond the Austin Heights and Maillardville neighbourhoods. The Detached Housing Alternatives component will identify opportunities such as laneway houses for areas that would remain as single family. We will also be looking at options for tools to limit the size of new homes. In July 2019, Council adopted a house size limit of 5,500 sq. ft. across single family areas of Southwest Coquitlam. The SWHR provides an opportunity to review and refine that approach.